Examining Dynamic Visual Scene Displays: Implications for Arranging and Teaching Symbol Selection Purpose Evidence supports using visual scene displays (VSDs) with young children using speech-generating devices. This study examined initial and subsequent performance during VSD use by children age 24–27 and 33–36 months to explore child characteristics that may relate to navigational skill differences. Method Children located 9 vocabulary items ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2010
Examining Dynamic Visual Scene Displays: Implications for Arranging and Teaching Symbol Selection
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrea Rachelle Olin
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Joe Reichle
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • LeAnne Johnson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Emily Monn
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Joe Reichle, University of Minnesota, Department of Communication Disorders, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455. E-mail: reich001@umn.edu.
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2010
Examining Dynamic Visual Scene Displays: Implications for Arranging and Teaching Symbol Selection
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2010, Vol. 19, 284-297. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0001)
History: Received January 2, 2009 , Revised July 21, 2009 , Accepted June 3, 2010
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2010, Vol. 19, 284-297. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0001)
History: Received January 2, 2009; Revised July 21, 2009; Accepted June 3, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose Evidence supports using visual scene displays (VSDs) with young children using speech-generating devices. This study examined initial and subsequent performance during VSD use by children age 24–27 and 33–36 months to explore child characteristics that may relate to navigational skill differences.

Method Children located 9 vocabulary items using a dynamic VSD. Tests of mean difference and analyses of variance were both completed to examine within- and between-age-group performance for accuracy and latency across 3 time points: at initial exposure, at criterion, and at a 2-week maintenance session for each of 2 linked navigational pages.

Results Results indicated that, at initial exposure, older participants' symbol selections were significantly more accurate and significantly faster when navigating through each page of a 2-page dynamic VSD. Results also indicated that though younger participants required significantly more sessions to achieve mastery, when the effects of practice and language comprehension were controlled, performance differences between age groups were not found when maintenance was evaluated.

Conclusions Older children perform better than younger children on initial opportunities. However, younger children learn to use VSDs in relatively few instructional opportunities, suggesting that VSDs can be used with children as young as 2 years of age.

Acknowledgments
We wish to acknowledge Rick Peterson, who assisted in creating stimuli used in this experiment. We also wish to acknowledge Dannel Friel and Dynavox Technologies for loaning equipment that enabled this investigation to be implemented.
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