Change I was recently asked to give a guest lecture in a colleague’s class on the topic of language-learning disabilities. To prepare for the lecture, I went back to old course files on my computer from when I taught the course “Language Disorders: School-Age Populations” back in 2001. To my ... Editorial
Editorial  |   May 01, 2009
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Editorial   |   May 01, 2009
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American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2009, Vol. 18, 114. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2009/ed-02)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2009, Vol. 18, 114. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2009/ed-02)
I was recently asked to give a guest lecture in a colleague’s class on the topic of language-learning disabilities. To prepare for the lecture, I went back to old course files on my computer from when I taught the course “Language Disorders: School-Age Populations” back in 2001. To my surprise, among my course files, there were no PowerPoint slideshows for me to review and (hopefully) borrow content from—rather, I found lecture notes written in longhand that corresponded to a set of overhead transparencies. It is almost impossible for me to recall teaching from lecture notes and transparencies, despite it only being a relatively short time ago when apparently I did! I don’t recall the transparency-to-PowerPoint transition as being particularly difficult, although I do recall there being a period where I would bring overhead transparencies of my PowerPoint slides as a “backup” when giving conference presentations. And, I’ll admit, occasionally I feel nostalgic for my transparencies, particularly in those perennial instances when technology lets me down.
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