The Importance of Production Frequency in Therapy for Childhood Apraxia of Speech Purpose This study explores the importance of production frequency during speech therapy to determine whether more practice of speech targets leads to increased performance within a treatment session, as well as to motor learning, in the form of generalization to untrained words. Method Two children with childhood apraxia ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2011
The Importance of Production Frequency in Therapy for Childhood Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Denice Michelle Edeal
    Portland State University, Portland, OR
  • Christina Elke Gildersleeve-Neumann
    Portland State University, Portland, OR
  • Correspondence to Christina Elke Gildersleeve-Neumann: cegn@pdx.edu
  • Denice Michelle Edeal is now with the Evergreen School District, Vancouver, WA.
    Denice Michelle Edeal is now with the Evergreen School District, Vancouver, WA.×
  • Editor: Laura Justice
    Editor: Laura Justice×
  • Associate Editor: Shelley Velleman
    Associate Editor: Shelley Velleman×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2011
The Importance of Production Frequency in Therapy for Childhood Apraxia of Speech
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2011, Vol. 20, 95-110. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/09-0005)
History: Received January 18, 2009 , Revised September 2, 2009 , Accepted February 1, 2011
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2011, Vol. 20, 95-110. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/09-0005)
History: Received January 18, 2009; Revised September 2, 2009; Accepted February 1, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

Purpose This study explores the importance of production frequency during speech therapy to determine whether more practice of speech targets leads to increased performance within a treatment session, as well as to motor learning, in the form of generalization to untrained words.

Method Two children with childhood apraxia of speech were treated with an alternating treatment AB design, with production frequency differing in the 2 treatments. The higher production frequency treatment required 100+ productions in 15 min, while the moderate-frequency treatment required 30–40 productions in the same time period. One child was treated 3 times weekly for 11 weeks; the other child was treated twice weekly for 5 weeks. At the conclusion of each treatment phase, 5 min of probes were administered to determine whether generalization had occurred. Maintenance data to measure performance and learning were collected after a break from treatment.

Results Both children showed improvement on all targets; however, the targets with the higher production frequency treatment were acquired faster, evidenced by better in-session performance and greater generalization to untrained probes.

Conclusions Both treatment designs were effective, though frequent and intense practice of speech resulted in more rapid response to treatment in 2 children whose primary communication difficulty was childhood apraxia of speech.

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