Influence of Visual Information on the Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech Purpose To examine the influence of visual information on speech intelligibility for a group of speakers with dysarthria associated with Parkinson’s disease. Method Eight speakers with Parkinson’s disease and dysarthria were recorded while they read sentences. Speakers performed a concurrent manual task to facilitate typical speech production. Twenty ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2007
Influence of Visual Information on the Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Connie K. Keintz
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Kate Bunton
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Contact author: Connie Keintz, who is now at Florida Atlantic University, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 777 Glades Road, P.O. Box 3091, Boca Raton, FL 33431. E-mail: ckeintz@fau.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2007
Influence of Visual Information on the Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2007, Vol. 16, 222-234. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/027)
History: Received October 4, 2005 , Revised March 6, 2006 , Accepted January 30, 2007
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2007, Vol. 16, 222-234. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/027)
History: Received October 4, 2005; Revised March 6, 2006; Accepted January 30, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

Purpose To examine the influence of visual information on speech intelligibility for a group of speakers with dysarthria associated with Parkinson’s disease.

Method Eight speakers with Parkinson’s disease and dysarthria were recorded while they read sentences. Speakers performed a concurrent manual task to facilitate typical speech production. Twenty listeners (10 experienced and 10 inexperienced) transcribed sentences while watching and listening to videotapes of the speakers (auditory-visual mode) and while only listening to the speakers (auditory-only mode).

Results Significant main effects were found for both presentation mode and speaker. Auditory-visual scores were significantly higher than auditory-only scores for the 3 speakers with the lowest intelligibility scores. No significant difference was found between the 2 listener groups.

Conclusions The findings suggest that clinicians should consider both auditory-visual and auditory-only intelligibility measures in speakers with Parkinson’s disease to determine the most effective strategies aimed at evaluation and treatment of speech intelligibility decrements.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank Dr. Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer and Dr. Brad Story for their valuable input to the design of this study and for their suggestions on an earlier version of this article. Support for this research was provided by National Multipurpose Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), NIDCD/National Institutes of Health Grant RO3-DC005902, and the Douglas G. Stuart Predoctoral Fellowship in Neuroscience at the University of Arizona. We thank Becca Lambson and Joanne McIntyre for video editing and Dr. Mark Borgstrom for statistical support. We are grateful to the speakers who produced the stimuli and the listeners who participated in the experiments.
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