Progressive Apraxia of Speech as a Sign of Motor Neuron Disease Purpose To document and describe in detail the occurrence of apraxia of speech (AOS) in a group of individuals with a diagnosis of motor neuron disease (MND). Method Seven individuals with MND and AOS were identified from among 80 patients with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases and AOS ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 2007
Progressive Apraxia of Speech as a Sign of Motor Neuron Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph R. Duffy
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Richard K. Peach
    Rush University Medical Center, Chicago
  • Edythe A. Strand
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Contact author: Joseph R. Duffy, Division of Speech Pathology, Dept. of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905. E-mail: jduffy@mayo.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Dysarthria / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 2007
Progressive Apraxia of Speech as a Sign of Motor Neuron Disease
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2007, Vol. 16, 198-208. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/025)
History: Received December 29, 2006 , Accepted April 11, 2007
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2007, Vol. 16, 198-208. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/025)
History: Received December 29, 2006; Accepted April 11, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 21

Purpose To document and describe in detail the occurrence of apraxia of speech (AOS) in a group of individuals with a diagnosis of motor neuron disease (MND).

Method Seven individuals with MND and AOS were identified from among 80 patients with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases and AOS (J. R. Duffy, 2006). The history, presenting complaints, neurological findings, and speech-language findings were documented for each case.

Results Spastic or mixed spastic-flaccid dysarthria was present in all 7 cases. The AOS was judged as worse than the dysarthria in 4 cases. Nonverbal oral apraxia was eventually present in all cases. Aphasia was present in 2 cases and equivocally present in another 2. Dementia was present in 1 case and equivocally present in 2.

Conclusions AOS can occur in MND, typically also with dysarthria, but not invariably with aphasia or other cognitive deficits. Thus, a diagnosis of MND does not preclude the presence of AOS. More importantly, MND should be a diagnostic consideration when AOS is a prominent sign of degenerative disease.

Acknowledgments
Portions of the information presented in this article were summarized in a presentation at the 2006 Motor Speech Conference in Austin, TX.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access