On the Level One of the many interesting things about being an Editor is seeing what problems recur in manuscript submissions. Over these past few years, I have encountered a problem in which levels of observation are confused or are crossed unwittingly. Here I will focus on speech-related manuscripts submitted to the ... Editorial
Editorial  |   August 01, 2007
On the Level
 
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  • Jeannette D. HoitEditor
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   August 01, 2007
On the Level
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2007, Vol. 16, 190. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/023)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2007, Vol. 16, 190. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/023)
One of the many interesting things about being an Editor is seeing what problems recur in manuscript submissions. Over these past few years, I have encountered a problem in which levels of observation are confused or are crossed unwittingly. Here I will focus on speech-related manuscripts submitted to the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology (AJSLP), although a similar discussion could be developed for language submissions.
Perhaps the most obvious problem I have seen is the failure to draw the distinction between speech production and speech. This distinction is an important one and is at the root of the difference between process and product. One way to think about the speech production process is to consider it as being partitioned into the following stages, each of which can be thought of as representing a different level of observation: neural (where the speech motor program is formulated and executed), muscular (where the powering of the speech production process is vested), structural (where the movements of speech production are manifested), and aeromechanical (where the pressure and flows of speech production are generated). Most actions at these levels are private (except certain events at the structural level). It is not until the process culminates in speech, the acoustic product of speech production, that it becomes public.
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