Letter to the Editor  |   February 2007
Pseudoscience and the SpeechEasy: Reply to Kalinowski, Saltuklaroglu, Stuart, and Guntupalli (2007)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne K. Bothe
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Patrick Finn
    The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Robin E. Bramlett
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Contact author: Anne K. Bothe, Department of Communication Sciences and Special Education, 556 Aderhold Hall, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602. E-mail: abothe@uga.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   February 2007
Pseudoscience and the SpeechEasy: Reply to Kalinowski, Saltuklaroglu, Stuart, and Guntupalli (2007)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2007, Vol. 16, 77-83. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/010)
History: Received August 18, 2006 , Accepted October 4, 2006
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2007, Vol. 16, 77-83. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/010)
History: Received August 18, 2006; Accepted October 4, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose: To respond to several of the issues raised in J. Kalinowski, T. Saltuklaroglu, A. Stuart, and V. K. Guntupalli’s (2007)  critique of our previous article (P. Finn, A. K. Bothe, & R. E. Bramlett, 2005).

Method: Information is provided to refute criticisms raised by Kalinowski et al. about the Finn et al. article, including with respect to that report’s methodology, previous research about fluency-inducing conditions in stuttering, and the SpeechEasy device.

Conclusions: Available data show that delayed auditory feedback, frequency-altered feedback, masking, and chorus reading can result in reduced stuttering for some speakers, and the inconsistencies and variability in available reports suggest that further careful and creative research could be very valuable. Neither the information about the SpeechEasy provided by its developers, however, nor the manner in which that information has been presented and discussed by its developers rises to the standards of a science-based clinical service discipline.

Acknowledgments
We thank Richard Andreatta, Holly Kaplan, and Brad Story for their expertise in previous and continuing conversations about the SpeechEasy.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access