Validity of the MacArthur–Bates Communicative Development Inventories for Measuring Language Abilities in Children With Cochlear Implants Purpose To examine the validity of the MacArthur–Bates Communicative Development Inventories (CDI) for measuring language abilities in children with profound hearing loss who are using cochlear implants. Method Twenty-four children with cochlear implants and their mothers participated in this study. Children ranged in age from 32 months to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2007
Validity of the MacArthur–Bates Communicative Development Inventories for Measuring Language Abilities in Children With Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donna Thal
    San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
  • Jean L. DesJardin
    House Ear Institute, Los Angeles
  • Laurie S. Eisenberg
    House Ear Institute, Los Angeles
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    Donna Thal is a coauthor of The MacArthur-Bates Communication Development Inventories (CDI). Royalties from CDI sales go into a nonprofit research fund that supports CDI-related research. Dr. Thal is eligible to apply for use of those funds and is subject to the same review process applied to all applicants.
    Donna Thal is a coauthor of The MacArthur-Bates Communication Development Inventories (CDI). Royalties from CDI sales go into a nonprofit research fund that supports CDI-related research. Dr. Thal is eligible to apply for use of those funds and is subject to the same review process applied to all applicants.×
  • Contact author: Donna J. Thal, San Diego State University, School of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, Developmental Psycholinguistics Laboratory, 6330 Alvarado Court, Suite 231, San Diego, CA 92120-1850. E-mail: dthal@mail.sdsu.edu.
Article Information
Development / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2007
Validity of the MacArthur–Bates Communicative Development Inventories for Measuring Language Abilities in Children With Cochlear Implants
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2007, Vol. 16, 54-64. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/007)
History: Received August 10, 2005 , Revised April 17, 2006 , Accepted September 2, 2006
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2007, Vol. 16, 54-64. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/007)
History: Received August 10, 2005; Revised April 17, 2006; Accepted September 2, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 47

Purpose To examine the validity of the MacArthur–Bates Communicative Development Inventories (CDI) for measuring language abilities in children with profound hearing loss who are using cochlear implants.

Method Twenty-four children with cochlear implants and their mothers participated in this study. Children ranged in age from 32 months to 86 months (the majority were 32 to 66 months old). The number of months postimplantation ranged from 3 to 60 (the majority were around 24 months). Mothers completed the CDI before behavioral testing. Behavioral measures included the Reynell Developmental Language Scales and measures of vocabulary and grammar from a spontaneous language sample.

Results Both the Words and Gestures and the Words and Sentences forms of the CDI were shown to have excellent validity for this sample of children, if they had language that was in the range measured by the instrument. Correlations with behavioral measures ranged from .41 to .93 and were comparable to those reported for children with typical development.

Conclusions The CDI forms are valid tools to use with children who are using cochlear implants and who are in the early stages of language development, even if they are older than the norming sample. Age-equivalence may be obtained if children score below the median for the oldest age norms. They may also be used to describe the language of children who are not at ceiling. Specific recommendations for interventionists are provided.

Acknowledgment
This research was funded by Grant R01DC006238 from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders.
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