Script Training and Generalization for People With Aphasia Purpose To examine the effects and generalization of a modified script training intervention, delivered partly via videoconferencing, on dialogue scripts that were produced by 2 individuals with aphasia. Method Each participant was trained on 2 personally relevant scripts. Intervention sessions occurred 3 times per week, with a combination ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2012
Script Training and Generalization for People With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Samantha Goldberg
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Katarina L. Haley
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Adam Jacks
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Correspondence to Katarina Haley: Katarina_Haley@med.unc.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Healther Wright
    Associate Editor: Healther Wright×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2012
Script Training and Generalization for People With Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2012, Vol. 21, 222-238. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0056)
History: Received June 1, 2011 , Revised November 20, 2011 , Accepted March 9, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2012, Vol. 21, 222-238. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0056)
History: Received June 1, 2011; Revised November 20, 2011; Accepted March 9, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

Purpose To examine the effects and generalization of a modified script training intervention, delivered partly via videoconferencing, on dialogue scripts that were produced by 2 individuals with aphasia.

Method Each participant was trained on 2 personally relevant scripts. Intervention sessions occurred 3 times per week, with a combination of in-person meetings and videoconferencing, and lasted for 3 weeks per script. This study followed a multiple baseline design across scripts. Measures of accuracy, grammatical productivity, speaking rate, and articulatory fluency were obtained during baseline, intervention, and maintenance phases. Generalization probes were administered by challenging participants to engage in a conversation about their script topic with conversation partners who did not follow the script.

Results Both participants showed improvement on all dependent variables for both scripts during and after the intervention phase. Generalization samples showed improved grammatical morpheme use and increased rate of speech over prebaseline samples.

Conclusion There is evidence that script training intervention can improve accuracy, grammatical productivity, speaking rate, and articulatory fluency in script production tasks as well as in more functional conversational tasks. Videoconferencing is a viable method of conducting script training intervention when it is supported by face-to-face intervention sessions, slight modifications to the procedure, and an emphasis on self-cuing skills.

Acknowledgments
We gratefully acknowledge JC and LE for their participation in this study. We also acknowledge Heidi Roth for assistance with lesion analysis and Julie Gaven, Anna Styers, Alisha Harron, and Kristin Peet for their help with data collection and reliability scoring. This research was completed as part of an MS thesis project by the first author at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Department of Allied Health Sciences, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, directed by Katarina L. Haley.
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