Training Production of Lexical Stress in Typically Developing Children Using Orthographically Biased Stimuli and Principles of Motor Learning Purpose Impaired lexical stress production characterizes multiple pediatric speech disorders. Effective remediation strategies are not available, and little is known about the normal process of learning to assign and produce lexical stress. This study examined whether typically developing (TD) children can be trained to produce lexical stress on bisyllabic pseudowords ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2012
Training Production of Lexical Stress in Typically Developing Children Using Orthographically Biased Stimuli and Principles of Motor Learning
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauren J. van Rees
    University of Sydney, Australia
  • Kirrie J. Ballard
    University of Sydney, Australia
  • Patricia McCabe
    University of Sydney, Australia
  • Anita G. Macdonald-D’Silva
    University of Sydney, Australia
  • Joanne Arciuli
    University of Sydney, Australia
  • Correspondence to Kirrie J Ballard: kirrie.ballard@sydney.edu.au
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Peter Flipsen
    Associate Editor: Peter Flipsen×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2012
Training Production of Lexical Stress in Typically Developing Children Using Orthographically Biased Stimuli and Principles of Motor Learning
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2012, Vol. 21, 197-206. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0008)
History: Received January 19, 2011 , Revised July 13, 2011 , Accepted March 7, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2012, Vol. 21, 197-206. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0008)
History: Received January 19, 2011; Revised July 13, 2011; Accepted March 7, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose Impaired lexical stress production characterizes multiple pediatric speech disorders. Effective remediation strategies are not available, and little is known about the normal process of learning to assign and produce lexical stress. This study examined whether typically developing (TD) children can be trained to produce lexical stress on bisyllabic pseudowords that are orthographically biased to a strong–weak or weak–strong pattern (e.g., MAMbey or beDOON), in combination with the principles of motor learning (PML).

Method Fourteen TD children ages 5;0 (years;months) to 13;0 were randomly assigned to a training or control group using concealed allocation within blocks. A pre- to posttraining group design was used to examine the acquisition, retention, and generalization of lexical stress production.

Results The training group learned to produce appropriate lexical stress for the pseudowords with strong maintenance and generalization to related untrained stimuli. Accuracy of stress production did not change in the control group.

Conclusion TD children can learn to produce lexical stress patterns for orthographically biased pseudowords via explicit training methods. Findings have relevance for the study of languages other than English and for a range of prosodic disorders.

Acknowledgments
We wish to thank Rob Heard for statistical advice and the families who generously donated their time. Parts of this study were presented at the 2010 Conference on Motor Speech in Savannah, GA, and the 2010 Speech Pathology Australia National Conference.
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