Identifying Residual Speech Sound Disorders in Bilingual Children: A Japanese-English Case Study Purpose To describe (a) the assessment of residual speech sound disorders (SSDs) in bilinguals by distinguishing speech patterns associated with second language acquisition from patterns associated with misarticulations and (b) how assessment of domains such as speech motor control and phonological awareness can provide a more complete understanding of SSDs ... Clinical Focus: Case Study
Clinical Focus: Case Study  |   May 01, 2011
Identifying Residual Speech Sound Disorders in Bilingual Children: A Japanese-English Case Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan L. Preston
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
    Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven
  • Ayumi Seki
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
    Tottori University, Tottori, Japan
  • Correspondence to Jonathan L. Preston: preston@haskins.yale.edu
  • Editor: Laura Justice
    Editor: Laura Justice×
  • Associate Editor: Shelley Velleman
    Associate Editor: Shelley Velleman×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Clinical Focus / Case Study
Clinical Focus: Case Study   |   May 01, 2011
Identifying Residual Speech Sound Disorders in Bilingual Children: A Japanese-English Case Study
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2011, Vol. 20, 73-85. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/10-0057)
History: Received June 18, 2010 , Accepted February 20, 2011
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2011, Vol. 20, 73-85. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/10-0057)
History: Received June 18, 2010; Accepted February 20, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose To describe (a) the assessment of residual speech sound disorders (SSDs) in bilinguals by distinguishing speech patterns associated with second language acquisition from patterns associated with misarticulations and (b) how assessment of domains such as speech motor control and phonological awareness can provide a more complete understanding of SSDs in bilinguals.

Method A review of Japanese phonology is provided to offer a context for understanding the transfer of Japanese to English productions. A case study of an 11-year-old is presented, demonstrating parallel speech assessments in English and Japanese. Speech motor and phonological awareness tasks were conducted in both languages.

Results Several patterns were observed in the participant’s English that could be plausibly explained by the influence of Japanese phonology. However, errors indicating a residual SSD were observed in both Japanese and English. A speech motor assessment suggested possible speech motor control problems, and phonological awareness was judged to be within the typical range of performance in both languages.

Conclusion Understanding the phonological characteristics of the native language can help clinicians recognize speech patterns in the second language associated with transfer. Once these differences are understood, patterns associated with a residual SSD can be identified. Supplementing a relational speech analysis with measures of speech motor control and phonological awareness can provide a more comprehensive understanding of a client’s strengths and needs.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grants 5P01HD001994 and T32HD7548 to Haskins Laboratories (C. Fowler, principal investigator) and Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research 195370 from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. We are grateful to the participant and his mother who provided consent for this case study. Thanks to Leah Fabiano-Smith for comments on the manuscript.
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