Broadening Our Knowledge About Diverse Populations It is well known that the diversity of the U.S. population is increasing. Although the official findings from the 2010 U.S. Census have not been released as yet, it is estimated that 35% of the population is from a racial-ethnic minority group, with 13% of the population being African ... Editorial
Editorial  |   May 01, 2011
Broadening Our Knowledge About Diverse Populations
 
Author Notes
  • Carol Scheffner HammerEditor
Article Information
From the Editor
Editorial   |   May 01, 2011
Broadening Our Knowledge About Diverse Populations
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2011, Vol. 20, 71-72. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/ed-02)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2011, Vol. 20, 71-72. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/ed-02)
It is well known that the diversity of the U.S. population is increasing. Although the official findings from the 2010 U.S. Census have not been released as yet, it is estimated that 35% of the population is from a racial-ethnic minority group, with 13% of the population being African American, 16% Hispanic, and 5% Asian/Pacific Islander. In 2030, it is projected that 43% of U.S. citizens will be from a culturally diverse background, with the increase in the percentage of Hispanics accounting for most of this change (U.S. Census Bureau, 2008). This means that speech-language pathologists will have increasingly diverse caseloads. In approximately 20 years, it is projected that children from culturally diverse backgrounds will constitute the majority of children attending U.S. schools. This increase will be observed in the adult population as well. By 2030, nearly 30% of the elderly will be from a diverse cultural group (Hernandez, Denton, & Macartney, 2009).
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