Research  |   May 2011
Parent Perceptions of the Language Development of Toddlers With Developmental Delays Before and After Participation in Parent-Coached Language Interventions
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • MaryAnn Romski
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Rose A. Sevcik
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Lauren B. Adamson
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Ashlyn Smith
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Melissa Cheslock
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Roger Bakeman
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Correspondence to MaryAnn Romski: mromski@gsu.edu
  • Editor: Laura Justice
    Editor: Laura Justice×
  • Associate Editor: Howard Goldstein
    Associate Editor: Howard Goldstein×
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Language Disorders
Research   |   May 2011
Parent Perceptions of the Language Development of Toddlers With Developmental Delays Before and After Participation in Parent-Coached Language Interventions
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2011, Vol. 20, 111-118. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/09-0087)
History: Received September 15, 2009 , Revised August 15, 2010 , Accepted February 1, 2011
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2011, Vol. 20, 111-118. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/09-0087)
History: Received September 15, 2009; Revised August 15, 2010; Accepted February 1, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose: This study examined parent perception of early communication development before and after participation in language intervention.

Method: Fifty-three parents of toddlers with developmental delays and fewer than 10 spoken words completed the Parent Perception of Language Development, an experimental measure, before and after the children were randomly assigned to a language intervention, 2 of which focused on augmented communication with a speech-generating device, and 1 of which focused exclusively on speech.

Results: After intervention, the parents' perceptions of success became more positive. Their perceptions of the severity of the child’s language difficulties decreased for the augmented interventions but increased for the spoken intervention. Child outcome correlated positively with success and negatively with difficulty, but only the correlation between number of spoken words and difficulty was statistically significant.

Conclusions: Augmented language intervention may not only help the child communicate but also have a positive impact on parent perception of language development.

Acknowledgments
The research described in this article was funded by National Institutes of Health Grant DC-03799. Earlier versions of this article were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention in November 2004 and at the Society for Research on Child Development meeting in March 2005. We would like to thank the parents and children who participated in this study.
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