Research Note  |   August 2010
Tongue Pressure and Submental Surface Electromyography Measures During Noneffortful and Effortful Saliva Swallows in Healthy Women
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erin M. Yeates
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Catriona M. Steele
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and University of Toronto
  • Cathy A. Pelletier
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
  • Contact author: Catriona M. Steele, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, 550 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2A2, Canada. E-mail: steele.catriona@torontorehab.on.ca.
  • Erin M. Yeates is now at the Saskatoon City Hospital, Saskatoon, Canada.
    Erin M. Yeates is now at the Saskatoon City Hospital, Saskatoon, Canada.×
  • © 2010 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Research Note
Research Note   |   August 2010
Tongue Pressure and Submental Surface Electromyography Measures During Noneffortful and Effortful Saliva Swallows in Healthy Women
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2010, Vol. 19, 274-281. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0040)
History: Received May 12, 2009 , Accepted May 7, 2010
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2010, Vol. 19, 274-281. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0040)
History: Received May 12, 2009; Accepted May 7, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Purpose: The effortful swallow, a compensatory technique frequently employed by speech-language pathologists for their patients with dysphagia, is still not fully understood in terms of how it modifies the swallow. In particular, although age-related changes are known to reduce maximum isometric tongue pressure, it is not known whether age affects people’s ability to perform the effortful swallow. In this study, differences were explored between younger and older healthy women in execution of the effortful swallowing maneuver through a comparative analysis of effortful and noneffortful swallows.

Method: Eighty healthy women (40 age 18–35 years and 40 age 60 and older) participated. Peak amplitude measures and the timing of signal onset to peak were measured using concurrent tongue pressure and submental surface electromyography.

Result: Statistically significant main effects of age group were not observed in the amplitude data, but older participants showed slower rise times to peak anterior tongue-palate pressure.

Conclusions: Despite the general age-related deterioration of the swallowing musculature due to the phenomenon of sarcopenia, older women can still produce noneffortful and effortful swallows with lingual pressure and submental surface electromyography amplitudes similar to younger women.

Acknowledgments
Primary funding for this study was provided through a New Investigator grant to the third author from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation. Additional funding support was provided by the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and a New Investigator Award to the second author from Canadian Institutes of Health Research Grant 69521. The authors acknowledge the support of Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, which receives funding under the Provincial Rehabilitation Research Program from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care in Ontario. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the ministry. The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Miranda Parks and Hope Phillips, who helped with participant screening and data collection, postprocessing, and analysis. A portion of these data were presented in poster format at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention in Chicago, IL, in November 2008.
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