The Effects of Measures of Language Experience and Language Ability on Segmental Accuracy in Bilingual Children Purpose The present study investigated the effects of selected measures of language experience (parent-reported estimates of frequency of output and language use) and language ability (parent-reported language proficiency and mean length of utterance in words) on the segmental accuracy of Spanish- and English-speaking bilingual children. Method The phonological ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2010
The Effects of Measures of Language Experience and Language Ability on Segmental Accuracy in Bilingual Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian A. Goldstein
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Ferenc Bunta
    The University of Houston, Houston, TX
  • Jenny Lange
    Temple University
  • Jenny Rodriguez
    Temple University
  • Lauren Burrows
    Temple University
  • Contact author: Brian A. Goldstein, Temple University, Communication Sciences and Disorders, 110 Weiss Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19122. E-mail: briang@temple.edu.
  • Jenny Lange is now with Moss Rehabilitation Hospital in Philadelphia, PA; Jenny Rodriguez is now with Miami Children’s Hospital in Miami, FL; and Lauren Burrows is now with KenCrest Services in Philadelphia, PA.
    Jenny Lange is now with Moss Rehabilitation Hospital in Philadelphia, PA; Jenny Rodriguez is now with Miami Children’s Hospital in Miami, FL; and Lauren Burrows is now with KenCrest Services in Philadelphia, PA.×
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2010
The Effects of Measures of Language Experience and Language Ability on Segmental Accuracy in Bilingual Children
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2010, Vol. 19, 238-247. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/08-0086)
History: Received December 16, 2008 , Revised June 15, 2009 , Accepted April 29, 2010
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2010, Vol. 19, 238-247. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/08-0086)
History: Received December 16, 2008; Revised June 15, 2009; Accepted April 29, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

Purpose The present study investigated the effects of selected measures of language experience (parent-reported estimates of frequency of output and language use) and language ability (parent-reported language proficiency and mean length of utterance in words) on the segmental accuracy of Spanish- and English-speaking bilingual children.

Method The phonological skills of 50 typically developing bilingual Spanish-English children (mean age = 5;9 [years;months]) were examined. Independent variables included parent estimates of language use, language proficiency, and frequency of language output (5 groups), as well as a direct language measure (mean length of utterance in words) to predict the dependent segmental accuracy measures (percentage of consonants and vowels correct).

Results Frequency of language output did not have an effect on any of the English or Spanish segmental accuracy measures. However, parent-reported language use and language proficiency as well as the direct measure of language ability (mean length of utterance in words) had various effects on segmental accuracy. Those effects differed, however, in language-specific patterns.

Conclusions Parental estimates of language use and language proficiency are useful for predicting the phonological skills of bilingual Spanish- and English-speaking children, and augmenting them with a direct measure of language ability as a predictor of segmental accuracy is desirable.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded in part by National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grant R03HD050208-02 and National Institutes of Health Contract N01-DC-8-2100. We are grateful to the families who took part in this project as well as to the schools that participated.
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