Research Article  |   August 2010
Measurement Properties and Classification Accuracy of Two Spanish Parent Surveys of Language Development for Preschool-Age Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Guiberson
    University of Northern Colorado, Greeley
  • Barbara L. Rodríguez
    The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Contact author: Mark Guiberson, University of Northern Colorado—Audiology and Speech Language Sciences, Gunter Hall, Campus Box 140, Greeley, CO 80639. E-mail: mark.guiberson@unco.edu.
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research Article
Research Article   |   August 2010
Measurement Properties and Classification Accuracy of Two Spanish Parent Surveys of Language Development for Preschool-Age Children
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2010, Vol. 19, 225-237. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0058)
History: Received July 2, 2009 , Revised December 17, 2009 , Accepted March 19, 2010
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2010, Vol. 19, 225-237. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0058)
History: Received July 2, 2009; Revised December 17, 2009; Accepted March 19, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose: To describe the concurrent validity and classification accuracy of 2 Spanish parent surveys of language development, the Spanish Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ; Squires, Potter, & Bricker, 1999) and the Pilot Inventario–III (Pilot INV–III; Guiberson, 2008a).

Method: Forty-eight Spanish-speaking parents of preschool-age children participated. Twenty-two children had expressive language delays, and 26 had typical language development. The parents completed the Spanish ASQ and the Pilot INV–III at home, and the Preschool Language Scale, Fourth Edition: Spanish Edition (PLS–4 Spanish; Zimmerman, Steiner, & Pond, 2002) was administered to the children at preschool centers.

Results: The Spanish ASQ and Pilot INV–III were significantly correlated with the PLS–4 Spanish, establishing concurrent validity. On both surveys, children with expressive language delays scored significantly lower than children with typical development. The Spanish ASQ demonstrated unacceptably low sensitivity (59%) and good specificity (92%), while the Pilot INV–III demonstrated fair sensitivity (82%) and specificity (81%). Likelihood ratios and posttest probability revealed that the Pilot INV–III may assist in detection of expressive language delays, but viewed alone it is insufficient to make an unconditional screening determination.

Conclusions: Results suggest that Spanish parent surveys hold promise for screening language delay in Spanish-speaking preschool children; however, further refinement of these tools is needed.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by an American Speech-Language-Hearing Association grant for projects on multicultural activities and grant funding from the University of Northern Colorado. We also would like to thank Dr. Philip Dale for his support of this project. Additionally, we would like to thank regional Head Start and other early childhood programs for assistance in recruiting families for this study. And finally, we would like to thank the families who participated.
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