Within-Treatment Factors as Predictors of Outcomes Following Conversational Recasting Purpose Although conversational recasting has been a generally successful treatment approach, the precise factors that influence children’s learning through recasts are not yet understood. In this study, we examined details of the relationship between child utterance and clinician utterance that seemed likely to influence learning. Method Three measures ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2010
Within-Treatment Factors as Predictors of Outcomes Following Conversational Recasting
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Johanna M. Hassink
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Laurence B. Leonard
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Laurence B. Leonard, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, 500 Oval Drive, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907. E-mail: xdxl@purdue.edu.
Article Information
Development / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2010
Within-Treatment Factors as Predictors of Outcomes Following Conversational Recasting
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2010, Vol. 19, 213-224. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0083)
History: Received September 1, 2009 , Revised December 9, 2009 , Accepted March 7, 2010
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2010, Vol. 19, 213-224. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0083)
History: Received September 1, 2009; Revised December 9, 2009; Accepted March 7, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

Purpose Although conversational recasting has been a generally successful treatment approach, the precise factors that influence children’s learning through recasts are not yet understood. In this study, we examined details of the relationship between child utterance and clinician utterance that seemed likely to influence learning.

Method Three measures were calculated from transcripts of recasting sessions with 17 preschoolers with specific language impairment. In all sessions, 3rd person singular –s served as the target. The measures of interest were the frequency of recasts following child utterances that were prompted by clinicians, the frequency of clinicians’ recasts of subjectless sentences, and the frequency of clinicians’ noncorrective recasts. We assessed the short-term and long-term predictive value of these measures through regression analyses.

Results Noncorrective recasts proved to be a positive predictor of short- and long-term gains in the use of the target form. Recasts of subjectless sentences were associated with poorer outcomes, though their contribution was relatively small.

Conclusions The nature of learning that takes place varies according to the relationship between child and clinician utterances during the recasting process. These variations have implications for clinical practice and for how learning through recasting is characterized.

Acknowledgments
The research reported in this article was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Research Grant R01 DC004544. We thank Lisa Goffman and Anne Smith for their valuable comments on this study and Allison Gladfelter and Lindsey McKnight for their assistance during the reliability phase of this work. Stephen Camarata, Barbara Brown, and Mary Camarata were significant members of the original research team. We are grateful to the many individuals who served as clinicians and to the families for allowing the children to participate.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access