Salami Science An important part of an Editor’s job is to make decisions. When a manuscript is submitted to the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, one of the many decisions that must be made is whether it meets or exceeds a “least publishable unit” criterion. To make this decision, I ask ... Editorial
Editorial  |   May 01, 2007
Salami Science
 
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  • Jeannette D. HoitEditor
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   May 01, 2007
Salami Science
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2007, Vol. 16, 94. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/013)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2007, Vol. 16, 94. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/013)
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An important part of an Editor’s job is to make decisions. When a manuscript is submitted to the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, one of the many decisions that must be made is whether it meets or exceeds a “least publishable unit” criterion. To make this decision, I ask myself the following question: “Does this manuscript contain enough new data, knowledge, or insight to warrant publication?” Fortunately, the answer to this is often a clear “yes.” However, sometimes the answer is not so clear. Consider the following hypothetical scenarios.
Scenario 1. A recent graduate writes two manuscripts based on dissertation work. One is submitted as a Tutorial and comprises the dissertation’s literature review; the other is submitted as a Research article and contains the report of the study proper. Should these two manuscripts be published?
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