Effects of Verbal Cue on Bolus Flow During Swallowing Purpose To examine the effects of verbal cuing to initiate swallowing on bolus flow measures in healthy adults. Method Videofluoroscopic examinations were completed in 12 healthy older adults (median age = 69 years) as they swallowed 5 ml of self-administered liquid barium in 2 conditions: verbally cued and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2007
Effects of Verbal Cue on Bolus Flow During Swallowing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephanie K. Daniels
    Southeast Louisiana Veterans Healthcare System and Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA
  • Mae Fern Schroeder
    Southeast Louisiana Veterans Healthcare System
  • Pamela C. DeGeorge
    Southeast Louisiana Veterans Healthcare System
  • David M. Corey
    Tulane University Health Sciences Center and Tulane University
  • John C. Rosenbek
    University of Florida Health Sciences Center and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, FL
  • Contact author: Stephanie K. Daniels, who is now at Rehab Research (153), Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, 2002 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030. E-mail: stephanie.daniels@va.gov.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2007
Effects of Verbal Cue on Bolus Flow During Swallowing
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2007, Vol. 16, 140-147. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/018)
History: Received February 22, 2006 , Accepted October 2, 2006
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2007, Vol. 16, 140-147. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/018)
History: Received February 22, 2006; Accepted October 2, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 34

Purpose To examine the effects of verbal cuing to initiate swallowing on bolus flow measures in healthy adults.

Method Videofluoroscopic examinations were completed in 12 healthy older adults (median age = 69 years) as they swallowed 5 ml of self-administered liquid barium in 2 conditions: verbally cued and noncued swallows. In the cued condition, participants held the liquid in their mouths until instructed to swallow. In the noncued condition, participants swallowed in their usual manner.

Results Verbal cue affected bolus position at onset of timing measures, thereby influencing duration. The bolus was positioned more posterior in the oral cavity at onset of oral transit for cued as compared with noncued swallows. The leading edge of the bolus at onset of the pharyngeal swallow was more superior in the pharynx for cued as compared with noncued swallows. Durations of the cued swallows were significantly shorter than for noncued swallows for all timing measures. Bolus direction scores were not significantly different between conditions.

Conclusions Findings suggest that swallowing is altered by the use of verbal cues to initiate swallowing in healthy adults. Determining whether shorter durations with implementation of verbal cues are evident in individuals with dysphagia and whether effects are beneficial or deleterious requires continued research.

Acknowledgments
This material was based on work supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, South Central VA Health Care Network through a pilot project grant, Rehabilitation Research and Development through Career Development Grant B3019V, and Grant M01-RR05096 from the Tulane-Charity-LSU General Clinical Research Center.
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