Speech and Language Skills of Parents of Children With Speech Sound Disorders Purpose This study compared parents with histories of speech sound disorders (SSD) to parents without known histories on measures of speech sound production, phonological processing, language, reading, and spelling. Familial aggregation for speech and language disorders was also examined. Method The participants were 147 parents of children with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2007
Speech and Language Skills of Parents of Children With Speech Sound Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara A. Lewis
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Lisa A. Freebairn
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Amy J. Hansen
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Lara Miscimarra
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Sudha K. Iyengar
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • H. Gerry Taylor
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Contact author: Barbara Lewis, Behavioral Pediatrics and Psychology 6038, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, Case Western Reserve University, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-6038. E-mail: bxl@po.cwru.edu.
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2007
Speech and Language Skills of Parents of Children With Speech Sound Disorders
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2007, Vol. 16, 108-118. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/015)
History: Received September 27, 2005 , Accepted September 2, 2006
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2007, Vol. 16, 108-118. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/015)
History: Received September 27, 2005; Accepted September 2, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 15

Purpose This study compared parents with histories of speech sound disorders (SSD) to parents without known histories on measures of speech sound production, phonological processing, language, reading, and spelling. Familial aggregation for speech and language disorders was also examined.

Method The participants were 147 parents of children with SSD (58 fathers and 89 mothers) who were directly tested and interviewed for family history of disorders.

Results Thirty-six parents (18 mothers and 18 fathers) reported enrollment in speech therapy as children for SSD. Parents with a history of speech therapy obtained lower scores on the Multisyllabic Word Repetition, Nonword Repetition, and Tongue Twister tasks than parents without such histories. These parents also had poorer reading, spelling, and receptive language skills. Parents with histories of SSD and additional language impairments (LI) performed worse than parents with isolated SSD on all measures except Pig Latin and oral motor skills. Familial aggregation for SSD and LI was supported. In addition, the likelihood of SSD in a family member increased by a factor of 1.9 over rates of SSD found in individuals without additional family members with SSD, and the odds of LI increased by a factor of 4.1 over rates of LI found in individuals without additional family members with LI for each additional family member with SSD or LI, respectively.

Conclusions The results documented both residual effects in adulthood of childhood SSD and familial aggregation for SSD. These residual difficulties do not appear to affect educational and occupational outcomes.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC00528 awarded to the first author. We wish to express our appreciation to the speech-language pathologists who assisted us in recruiting participants, and to the families who generously agreed to participate.
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