Facilitating Behavioral Change in Voice Therapy: The Relevance of Motivational Interviewing Purpose The purpose of this article is to present an exploration of some of the issues surrounding adherence to vocal behavioral change in voice therapy within the context of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and to explore MI’s potential for integration into voice therapy (MI-adapted voice therapy). MI is a style of ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 2006
Facilitating Behavioral Change in Voice Therapy: The Relevance of Motivational Interviewing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alison Behrman
    New York University
  • Contact author: Alison Behrman, Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, New York University, 719 Broadway, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10003. E-mail: asb2021@nyu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 2006
Facilitating Behavioral Change in Voice Therapy: The Relevance of Motivational Interviewing
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2006, Vol. 15, 215-225. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/020)
History: Received June 20, 2005 , Revised October 4, 2005 , Accepted February 11, 2006
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2006, Vol. 15, 215-225. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/020)
History: Received June 20, 2005; Revised October 4, 2005; Accepted February 11, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 29

Purpose The purpose of this article is to present an exploration of some of the issues surrounding adherence to vocal behavioral change in voice therapy within the context of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and to explore MI’s potential for integration into voice therapy (MI-adapted voice therapy). MI is a style of interpersonal communication in which resistance is minimized through the use of skillful listening in a directive, constructive discussion about behavior change. The goal of MI-adapted voice therapy is to enhance patient adherence to vocal behavioral change.

Method A narrative review of the literature is presented, together with the experiences of the author with 10 adult patients with voice disorders who participated in MI-adapted voice therapy.

Results It is shown that the principles of MI can be applied throughout the therapy program. Points of resistance to vocal behavioral change that were common across many patients appeared to be addressed appropriately by specific MI dialogue strategies.

Conclusions It is concluded that MI-adapted voice therapy holds promise as an approach to address patient adherence to vocal behavioral change. However, research is necessary to define the efficacy of this approach and the factors associated with its efficacy.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by Grant R03-DC005550-01A1 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Jeffrey Parsons, PhD, of the Department of Psychology at Hunter College, City University of New York, generously assisted the author in the preparation of the basic description of Motivational Interviewing.
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