Parents' and Professionals' Perceptions of the Implementation of Family-Centered Practices in Child Assessments Purpose To determine the degree to which early intervention professionals and families agreed on whether specific family-centered practices were implemented in specific child assessments and which practices were viewed as important to include in future child assessments. Method A self-rating instrument was used to survey 134 early intervention ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2006
Parents' and Professionals' Perceptions of the Implementation of Family-Centered Practices in Child Assessments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth R. Crais
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Vicky Poston Roy
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Karen Free
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Contact author: Elizabeth Crais, Division of Speech & Hearing Sciences, CB 7190, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7190. E-mail: bcrais@med.unc.edu.
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2006
Parents' and Professionals' Perceptions of the Implementation of Family-Centered Practices in Child Assessments
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2006, Vol. 15, 365-377. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/034)
History: Received August 30, 2004 , Revised September 4, 2005 , Accepted May 25, 2006
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2006, Vol. 15, 365-377. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/034)
History: Received August 30, 2004; Revised September 4, 2005; Accepted May 25, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 38

Purpose To determine the degree to which early intervention professionals and families agreed on whether specific family-centered practices were implemented in specific child assessments and which practices were viewed as important to include in future child assessments.

Method A self-rating instrument was used to survey 134 early intervention professionals (across a variety of disciplines) and 58 family members in triads (2 professionals and 1 family member for each assessment) after they had participated together in a child assessment. Participants were asked to identify across 41 family-centered practices whether the practice was implemented (actual practice) and would be important to include in future assessments (ideal practice).

Results Agreement between families and professionals and between professionals was high for both actual practices (69% and 78%, respectively) and ideal practices (82% and 84%, respectively). Some practices were frequently implemented, whereas others were seldom implemented. Both professionals and families viewed most of the practices as ideal. However, an implementation gap was seen on almost half of the practices between what families and professionals viewed as actually implemented and what was ideal implementation.

Conclusions Although a number of family-centered practices were implemented in the child assessments studied, the results pinpointed specific practices that professionals and families agreed should be changed. The results can serve as a guide for enhancing the implementation of, and continued investigation into, family-centered practices in child assessment and can add key information toward the identification of evidence-based practices.

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