Longitudinal Predictors of Implicit Phonological Awareness Skills Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal predictive relationships among variables that may contribute to poor phonological awareness skills in preschool-age children with speech-sound disorders. Method Forty-seven children with speech-sound disorders were assessed during the spring of their prekindergarten year and again at the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2006
Longitudinal Predictors of Implicit Phonological Awareness Skills
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Rvachew
    McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Contact author: Susan Rvachew, Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, 1266 Pine Avenue West, Montréal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1A8. Email: susan.rvachew@mcgill.ca
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2006
Longitudinal Predictors of Implicit Phonological Awareness Skills
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2006, Vol. 15, 165-176. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/016)
History: Received June 5, 2005 , Revised September 7, 2005 , Accepted January 6, 2006
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2006, Vol. 15, 165-176. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/016)
History: Received June 5, 2005; Revised September 7, 2005; Accepted January 6, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 33

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal predictive relationships among variables that may contribute to poor phonological awareness skills in preschool-age children with speech-sound disorders.

Method Forty-seven children with speech-sound disorders were assessed during the spring of their prekindergarten year and again at the end of their kindergarten year. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to examine relationships among the children’s prekindergarten and kindergarten performance on measures of speech perception, vocabulary, articulation, and phonological awareness skills in order to verify a proposed developmental ordering of these variables during this 1-year period.

Results Prekindergarten speech perception skills and receptive vocabulary size each explained unique variance in phonological awareness at the end of kindergarten. Prekindergarten articulation abilities did not predict unique variance in phonological awareness a year later. Prekindergarten speech perception skills also explained unique variance in articulation skills at the end of kindergarten.

Conclusions Maximizing children’s vocabulary and speech perception skills before they begin school may be an important strategy for ensuring that children with speech-sound disorders begin school with age-appropriate speech and phonological awareness abilities.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant from the Canadian Language and Literacy Research Network. We are also grateful for the support of the Speech-Language Departments of the Alberta Children’s Hospital and the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, and we thank Ms. Jill Newman and Dr. Robin Gaines in particular for their assistance with subject recruitment. Thanks are also extended to the participants and their parents for their time and cooperation in this study. The many students involved in the collection and processing of data are also acknowledged, in particular Genevieve Cloutier, Natalia Evans, Meghann Grawburg, Joan Heyding, Debbie Hughes, Alyssa Ohberg, Alysha Serviss, Rishanthi Sivakumaran, and Jessica Whitely.
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