The Personalized Cueing Method: From the Laboratory to the Clinic Purpose The personalized cueing method is a novel procedure for treating naming deficits of persons with aphasia that is relatively unfamiliar to most speech-language pathologists. The goal of this article is to introduce the personalized cueing method to clinicians so that it might be expanded and improved upon. It is ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 2006
The Personalized Cueing Method: From the Laboratory to the Clinic
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert C. Marshall
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Donald B. Freed
    California State University, Fresno
  • Contact author: Robert C. Marshall, University of Kentucky, College of Health Sciences (Room 120F-CTW), 900 S. Limestone, Lexington, KY 40536-0200. Email: rcmarsh@uky.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 2006
The Personalized Cueing Method: From the Laboratory to the Clinic
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2006, Vol. 15, 103-111. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/011)
History: Received July 5, 2005 , Revised October 12, 2005 , Accepted December 23, 2005
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2006, Vol. 15, 103-111. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/011)
History: Received July 5, 2005; Revised October 12, 2005; Accepted December 23, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose The personalized cueing method is a novel procedure for treating naming deficits of persons with aphasia that is relatively unfamiliar to most speech-language pathologists. The goal of this article is to introduce the personalized cueing method to clinicians so that it might be expanded and improved upon. It is also hoped that this article will promote further research in the treatment of naming deficits of clients with aphasia.

Method This clinical focus article (a) describes the origins of the personalized cueing method, the steps involved in creating personalized cues, and training and assessment procedures used with the personalized cueing method; (b) summarizes the published research supporting the use of the personalized cueing method; and (c) highlights some of the clinical advantages of this novel naming treatment for clients and clinicians.

Results Research with the personalized cueing method indicates that durability (long-term naming accuracy) for items trained with the personalized cueing method exceeds that for items trained with phonological cueing and other methods. It further shows that as the stimuli used to train naming in the personalized cueing experiments have become more realistic, durability of personalized cueing has increased.

Conclusion Personalized cueing is a parsimonious approach for treatment of naming deficits of persons with aphasia that has shown positive treatment effects in 8–12 training sessions.

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