Cross talking I was recently reminded of the importance of being able to talk across disciplinary lines. This reminder came in the form of a presentation I made to a group of clinical scientists who represented many disciplines, including otolaryngology, gastroenterology, neonatology, neurology, radiology, pulmonology, nursing, pediatrics, and speech-language pathology. They ... From the Editor
From the Editor  |   May 2006
Cross talking
 
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  • © 2006 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / ASHA News & Member Stories / From the Editor
From the Editor   |   May 2006
Cross talking
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2006, Vol. 15, 102. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/010)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2006, Vol. 15, 102. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/010)
I was recently reminded of the importance of being able to talk across disciplinary lines. This reminder came in the form of a presentation I made to a group of clinical scientists who represented many disciplines, including otolaryngology, gastroenterology, neonatology, neurology, radiology, pulmonology, nursing, pediatrics, and speech-language pathology. They came together from diverse backgrounds to discuss their common interest in breathing and swallowing. What could I say to them about my topic (respiratory measurement) that would be interesting to the sophisticated, yet understandable to the uninitiated? Finding the eclectic middle ground is often challenging.
Fortunately, my doctoral program and postdoctoral fellowship helped prepare me for cross talking. Throughout my doctoral program, I was actively involved with a multidisciplinary group of scientists interested in motor control. This is where I learned that even very smart people don’t necessarily know much, if anything, about my particular area of research. My cross-talking education continued during my postdoctoral fellowship, where I interacted with scientists interested in topics as diverse as the mechanical properties of surfactant, respiration in the exercising emu, and breathing sensations in humans with spinal cord injury. This was also where I began to develop my interdisciplinary research skills. Today, many years later, I continue to collaborate with a research team consisting of a respiratory physiologist, physiological psychologist, pulmonologist, and speech scientist.
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