Listener Perception of Respiratory-Induced Voice Tremor Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the relation of respiratory oscillation to the perception of voice tremor. Method Forced oscillation of the respiratory system was used to simulate variations in alveolar pressure such as are characteristic of voice tremor of respiratory origin. Five healthy men ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2006
Listener Perception of Respiratory-Induced Voice Tremor
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kimberly A. Farinella
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Thomas J. Hixon
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Brad H. Story
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Patricia A. Jones
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Contact author: Kimberly A. Farinella, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210071, Tucson, AZ 85721. Email: kaf@u.arizona.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2006
Listener Perception of Respiratory-Induced Voice Tremor
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2006, Vol. 15, 72-84. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/008)
History: Received May 18, 2005 , Revised August 29, 2005 , Accepted November 10, 2005
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2006, Vol. 15, 72-84. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/008)
History: Received May 18, 2005; Revised August 29, 2005; Accepted November 10, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the relation of respiratory oscillation to the perception of voice tremor.

Method Forced oscillation of the respiratory system was used to simulate variations in alveolar pressure such as are characteristic of voice tremor of respiratory origin. Five healthy men served as speakers, and 6 clinically experienced women served as listeners. Speakers produced utterances while forced sinusoidal pressure changes were applied to the surface of the respiratory system. Utterances included vowels and sentences produced using usual loudness, pitch, quality, and rate, and vowels produced using different loudness, pitch, and quality. Perceptual tasks included detection threshold for voice tremor and pair comparison judgments in which listeners identified the sample with the greater magnitude of voice tremor.

Results The mean detection threshold for voice tremor was 1.37 cmH2O (SD = 0.47) for vowel utterances and 2.16 cmH2O (SD = 1.52) for sentence utterances. Tremor magnitude was judged to be different for vowel and sentence utterances, but not for different vowels. Results revealed differential effects for loudness, pitch, and quality.

Conclusions These findings offer implications for the evaluation and management of voice tremor of respiratory causation.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported, in part, by National Multipurpose Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.
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