A Clinical Method for the Detection and Quantification of Quick Respiratory Hyperkinesia Purpose Quick respiratory hyperkinesia can be difficult to detect with the naked eye. A clinical method is described for the detection and quantification of quick respiratory hyperkinesia. Method Flow at the airway opening is sensed during spontaneous apnea (rest), voluntary breath holding (postural fixation), and voluntary volume displacement ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   February 01, 2006
A Clinical Method for the Detection and Quantification of Quick Respiratory Hyperkinesia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas J. Hixon
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Contact author: Thomas J. Hixon, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders, University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210071, Tucson, AZ 85721. Email: hixon@u.arizona.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   February 01, 2006
A Clinical Method for the Detection and Quantification of Quick Respiratory Hyperkinesia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2006, Vol. 15, 15-19. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/003)
History: Received March 31, 2005 , Revised June 11, 2005 , Accepted September 15, 2005
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2006, Vol. 15, 15-19. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2006/003)
History: Received March 31, 2005; Revised June 11, 2005; Accepted September 15, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Quick respiratory hyperkinesia can be difficult to detect with the naked eye. A clinical method is described for the detection and quantification of quick respiratory hyperkinesia.

Method Flow at the airway opening is sensed during spontaneous apnea (rest), voluntary breath holding (postural fixation), and voluntary volume displacement (intentional movement). The method is designed to reveal quick respiratory hyperkinesia independent of the function of the larynx and/or upper airway. Theory underlying the method is discussed, and a protocol is offered for clinical use.

Conclusions This method may be useful to neurologists, pulmonologists, and speech-language pathologists. Because it depends on nonspeech observations, its application to speech and/or voice production must be inferred.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by National Multipurpose Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. We thank Dr. Kate Bunton and Dr. Brad Story for their assistance in creating Figure 2. We dedicate this article to the late Dr. James F. Curtis, Professor Emeritus, University of Iowa.
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