Defining and Measuring Dysphagia Following Stroke Purpose To continue the development of a quantified, standard method to differentiate individuals with stroke and dysphagia from individuals without dysphagia. Method Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) were completed on a group of participants with acute stroke (n = 42) and healthy age-matched individuals (n = 25). Calibrated liquid ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2009
Defining and Measuring Dysphagia Following Stroke
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephanie K. Daniels
    Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • Mae Fern Schroeder
    Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, New Orleans, LA
  • Pamela C. DeGeorge
    Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, New Orleans, LA
  • David M. Corey
    Tulane University, New Orleans, LA
  • Anne L. Foundas
    Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA
  • John C. Rosenbek
    University of Florida Health Sciences Center, and Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, VA Medical Center, Gainesville, FL
  • Contact author: Stephanie K. Daniels, Rehab Research (153), Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, 2002 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030. E-mail: stephanie.daniels@va.gov.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2009
Defining and Measuring Dysphagia Following Stroke
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2009, Vol. 18, 74-81. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/07-0040)
History: Received May 31, 2007 , Accepted June 26, 2008
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2009, Vol. 18, 74-81. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/07-0040)
History: Received May 31, 2007; Accepted June 26, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

Purpose To continue the development of a quantified, standard method to differentiate individuals with stroke and dysphagia from individuals without dysphagia.

Method Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) were completed on a group of participants with acute stroke (n = 42) and healthy age-matched individuals (n = 25). Calibrated liquid volumes of 3, 5, 10, and 20 ml were administered during the VFSS. Six measures in 3 domains of bolus flow (timing, direction, and clearance) were measured. Values of these measures obtained from the control group were used to classify dysphagia within the participants.

Results The use of a single measure or single liquid volumes to classify dysphagia did not distinguish between healthy adults and individuals following stroke with and without dysphagia. Abnormality on more than 1 measure across multiple volumes appears to be a more robust method in defining dysphagia for liquids.

Conclusions Our findings indicate that the definition of dysphagia is critical in determining whether persons are classified with disordered swallowing. The definition is dependent on materials and measures evaluated. Each measure provides independent aspects to the evaluation. Determining the level of importance of each depends on the purpose of the evaluation.

Acknowledgments
This material is based on work completed at the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System in New Orleans, LA, and was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Rehabilitation Research and Development, through Career Development Grants B3019V and B4262K.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access