Broadening the “Ports of Entry” for Speech-Language Pathologists: A Relational and Reflective Model for Clinical Supervision Purpose To offer a framework for clinical supervision in speech-language pathology that embeds a mental health perspective within the study of communication sciences and disorders. Method Key mental health constructs are examined as to how they are applied in traditional versus relational and reflective supervision models. Comparisons between ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   February 01, 2009
Broadening the “Ports of Entry” for Speech-Language Pathologists: A Relational and Reflective Model for Clinical Supervision
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine Geller
    Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY
  • Gilbert M. Foley
    Yeshiva University, New York
  • Contact author: Elaine Geller, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Long Island University/Brooklyn, One University Plaza, Brooklyn, NY 11201. E-mail: egeller@liu.edu.
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   February 01, 2009
Broadening the “Ports of Entry” for Speech-Language Pathologists: A Relational and Reflective Model for Clinical Supervision
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2009, Vol. 18, 22-41. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/07-0053)
History: Received July 6, 2007 , Accepted March 19, 2008
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2009, Vol. 18, 22-41. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/07-0053)
History: Received July 6, 2007; Accepted March 19, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

Purpose To offer a framework for clinical supervision in speech-language pathology that embeds a mental health perspective within the study of communication sciences and disorders.

Method Key mental health constructs are examined as to how they are applied in traditional versus relational and reflective supervision models. Comparisons between traditional and relational and reflective approaches are outlined, with reference to each mental health construct and the developmental level of the supervisee. Three stages of supervisee development are proposed based on research from various disciplines, including nursing, psychology, speech-language pathology, social work, and education. Each developmental stage is characterized by shifts or changes in the supervisee’s underlying assumptions, beliefs, and patterns of behavior.

Conclusion This article makes the case that both the cognitive and affective dimensions of the supervisor–supervisee relationship need to be addressed without minimizing the necessary development of discipline-specific expertise. The developmental stages outlined in this paradigm can be used to understand supervisees' patterns of change and growth over time, as well as to create optimal learning environments that match their developmental level and knowledge base.

Acknowledgments
Parts of this article were submitted in partial fulfillment of the certificate requirements of the Infant-Parent Study Center, Institute for Infants, Children & Families/Martha K. Selig Educational Institute, Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services. The first author gratefully acknowledges the invaluable supervision and mentoring provided by Gilbert M. Foley, EdD, and Rebecca Shahmoon-Shanok, MSW, PhD, during her training at the Infant-Parent Study Center. Also, the authors thank Raisa Shildkrot for her technical assistance in the preparation of this article.
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