Causal Claims One of the more exciting aspects of conducting research is being able to demonstrate causal relations among variables. For instance, study findings reported recently in this journal demonstrated causal relations between fundamental frequency and speech intelligibility in a controlled experiment (Watson & Schlauch, 2008). In this study, participants provided ... Editorial
Editorial  |   February 01, 2009
Causal Claims
 
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  • Laura JusticeEditor
Article Information
From the Editor
Editorial   |   February 01, 2009
Causal Claims
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2009, Vol. 18, 2-3. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2009/ed-01)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2009, Vol. 18, 2-3. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2009/ed-01)
One of the more exciting aspects of conducting research is being able to demonstrate causal relations among variables. For instance, study findings reported recently in this journal demonstrated causal relations between fundamental frequency and speech intelligibility in a controlled experiment (Watson & Schlauch, 2008). In this study, participants provided intelligibility estimates on planned variations of speech samples featuring manipulations of fundamental frequency. Adhering to traditional experimental methods, the researchers manipulated an independent variable (IV; fundamental frequency) and measured effects of these manipulations on a dependent variable (DV; intelligibility estimates by listeners). Because the researchers addressed the main study hypothesis using well-controlled experimental methods, they can appropriately assert causal relations between the IV and DV.
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