Multicultural/Multilingual Instruction in Educational Programs: A Survey of Perceived Faculty Practices and Outcomes Purpose To describe the instructional strategies reported for multicultural/multilingual issues (MMI) education at programs in speech-language pathology and audiology and the perceived ease and effectiveness of doing so. Method A 49-item questionnaire elicited anonymous responses from administrators, faculty, and teaching clinical supervisors at educational programs accredited by the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2008
Multicultural/Multilingual Instruction in Educational Programs: A Survey of Perceived Faculty Practices and Outcomes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ida J. Stockman
    Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Johanna Boult
    University of Louisiana at Monroe
  • Gregory C. Robinson
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
  • Contact author: Ida J. Stockman, Michigan State University, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Oyer Speech and Hearing Clinic, East Lansing, MI 48824-1212. E-mail: stockma1@msu.edu.
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2008
Multicultural/Multilingual Instruction in Educational Programs: A Survey of Perceived Faculty Practices and Outcomes
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2008, Vol. 17, 241-264. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/023)
History: Received April 10, 2006 , Revised October 19, 2006 , Accepted December 18, 2007
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2008, Vol. 17, 241-264. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/023)
History: Received April 10, 2006; Revised October 19, 2006; Accepted December 18, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose To describe the instructional strategies reported for multicultural/multilingual issues (MMI) education at programs in speech-language pathology and audiology and the perceived ease and effectiveness of doing so.

Method A 49-item questionnaire elicited anonymous responses from administrators, faculty, and teaching clinical supervisors at educational programs accredited by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in the United States. The data were provided by 731 respondents from 79.6% of 231 accredited U.S. programs. They included instructors who taught courses dedicated to MMI and those who did not.

Results Respondents were generally committed to multicultural instruction, but they varied in their reported instructional practices and perceived levels of preparedness, effectiveness, and needs. General curricular infusion without an MMI-dedicated course was the most common instructional model used. Students were judged to be at least modestly prepared to deal with diversity issues as a result of their multicultural instruction, although current instructional approaches were not viewed as optimal. More positive outcomes were reported by instructors of MMI-dedicated than MMI-nondedicated courses.

Conclusion The instructional models and strategies used for MMI education vary, and programs are challenged by multiple issues in complying with the mandate for MMI curricular infusion.

Acknowledgments
The authors gratefully acknowledge the institutional and labor support from many other persons. The execution of the project was supported by a grant from the ASHA Offices of Multicultural Affairs and Academic Affairs. The authors are indebted to Deborah Busacco, Vicki Deal-Willams, Karen Beverly-Ducker, and Lauren Ero for their general support of the project. The authors also are grateful for questionnaire editing, distribution, and respondent analyses as provided by postgraduate students Jody Kosanke and Lisa Lamont, graduate students Monica Clark-Robinson, Lauren Giffen, Kristin Grelik, Abby Haxton, Gina Hetherington, Mary Jo Hidecker, Jerrod Jackson, and Diane Ogiela, and undergraduate students Frederic Cage, Laura Karasinski, Emily Lauher, and Elaina Swartzlander.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access