Teaching a Young Child With Autism to Request Assistance Conditionally: A Preliminary Study Purpose: Investigators taught a 5-year-old boy with autistic disorder and severe language delay to conditionally use requests for assistance.Method: A within-participant multiple-probe design across 3 functional tasks was implemented in order to evaluate the child’s acquisition and conditional use of requests for assistance during intervention with each task.Results: ... Research
Research  |   August 2008
Teaching a Young Child With Autism to Request Assistance Conditionally: A Preliminary Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joe Reichle
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Patricia L. Dropik
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Elizabeth Alden-Anderson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Tom Haley
    Minnesota Autism Center, Minnetonka
  • Contact author: Joe Reichle, 115 Shevlin Hall, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455. E-mail: reich001@umn.edu.
  • © 2008 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum
Research   |   August 2008
Teaching a Young Child With Autism to Request Assistance Conditionally: A Preliminary Study
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2008, Vol. 17, 231-240. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/022)
History: Received January 19, 2007 , Accepted November 12, 2007
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2008, Vol. 17, 231-240. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/022)
History: Received January 19, 2007; Accepted November 12, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose: Investigators taught a 5-year-old boy with autistic disorder and severe language delay to conditionally use requests for assistance.

Method: A within-participant multiple-probe design across 3 functional tasks was implemented in order to evaluate the child’s acquisition and conditional use of requests for assistance during intervention with each task.

Results: Results indicated initial acquisition of requests for assistance followed by a brief period of overgeneralization. As independence in completing a task increased, requests for assistance correspondingly decreased. The participant’s conditional use of requests for assistance and independent task completion were sustained across time.

Conclusion: This study highlights the need to assess conditional use of newly taught communicative behavior.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank the participant and his family for their support and participation in this study. We also thank the staff from the Minnesota Autism Center for their enthusiastic and diligent assistance in implementation and data collection. Thanks also to Edward Carney of the Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, for his assistance in final preparation of this article.
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