Research  |   August 2008
Effects of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Intervention on Speech Production in Children With Autism: A Systematic Review
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ralf W. Schlosser
    Northeastern University, Boston
  • Oliver Wendt
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Ralf W. Schlosser, Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Northeastern University, 151B Forsyth, Boston, MA 02115. E-mail: r.schlosser@neu.edu.
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Research   |   August 2008
Effects of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Intervention on Speech Production in Children With Autism: A Systematic Review
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology August 2008, Vol.17, 212-230. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/021)
History: Accepted 07 Nov 2007 , Received 25 Jul 2007
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology August 2008, Vol.17, 212-230. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/021)
History: Accepted 07 Nov 2007 , Received 25 Jul 2007

Purpose: This systematic review aimed to determine the effects of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention on speech production in children with autism or pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified.

Method: A systematic review methodology was utilized to limit bias in searching, selecting, coding, and synthesizing relevant treatment studies. This involved a multifaceted search for studies written between 1975 and May 2007 using various bibliographic databases, dissertation databases, hand searches of selected journals and published compilations of AAC theses and dissertations, and ancestry searches. To be included, studies had to meet stringent criteria. A coding manual and form facilitated data extraction in terms of participant characteristics, treatment characteristics, design and measurement, and outcomes.

Results: Nine single-subject experimental design (27 participants) and 2 group studies (98 participants) were included. Results indicated that AAC interventions do not impede speech production. In fact, most studies reported an increase in speech production. However, in-depth analyses revealed that the gains were rather modest.

Conclusions: Although AAC interventions do not appear to impede speech production and may result in increased speech production, the modest gains observed require realistic expectations among clinicians and other stakeholders. Future research should be more hypothesis driven and aim to identify predictive child characteristics, such as prior speech imitation and object exploration skills.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access

Related Articles

Severe Speech Sound Disorders: An Integrated Multimodal Intervention
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools April 2013, Vol.44, 195-210. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2012/12-0023)
Overheard: Partnering to Make AAC Work Better for Kids With ASDs
The ASHA Leader April 2013, Vol.18, 16-17. doi:10.1044/leader.OV.18042013.16
Peer-Mediated AAC Instruction for Young Children With Autism and other Developmental Disabilities
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication December 2012, Vol.21, 159-166. doi:10.1044/aac21.4.159
“I Can See What You’re Saying”: Clinical Utility of Spectral Moment Analysis
SIG 5 Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders October 2011, Vol.21, 44-54. doi:10.1044/ssod21.2.44
A Revolution at Their Fingertips
SIG 12 Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication April 2011, Vol.20, 19-23. doi:10.1044/aac20.1.19