Treatment Research The current context in which the speech and language community conducts its research is one that increasingly places a premium on the generation of knowledge that has direct bearing on the complex, multidetermined disorders we treat and the multifaceted environments in which we work. Practitioners and policy makers seek ... Editorial
Editorial  |   August 01, 2008
Treatment Research
 
Author Notes
  • Laura JusticeEditor
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   August 01, 2008
Treatment Research
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2008, Vol. 17, 210-211. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/020)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2008, Vol. 17, 210-211. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/020)
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4
The current context in which the speech and language community conducts its research is one that increasingly places a premium on the generation of knowledge that has direct bearing on the complex, multidetermined disorders we treat and the multifaceted environments in which we work. Practitioners and policy makers seek from the research community “usable knowledge” that offers direct translations to clinical practice—findings that can be readily embedded into the complex host environments in which communication disorders are identified and treated. While most if not all of the research published within AJSLP exemplifies the concept of “use-inspired research” (Stokes, 1997), treatment studies are those that typically have the most immediate potential for direct translation to clinical practice. We ought to be concerned if the volume of work produced by our research community is insufficient in its quality, quantity, or both.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access