Self-Administered Cued Naming Therapy: A Single-Participant Investigation of a Computer-Based Therapy Program Replicated in Four Cases Purpose This study examined the benefits of a self-administered, clinician-guided, computer-based, cued naming therapy. Results of intense and nonintense treatment schedules were compared. Method A single-participant design with multiple baselines across behaviors and varied treatment intensity for 2 trained lists was replicated over 4 participants. Two lists of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2007
Self-Administered Cued Naming Therapy: A Single-Participant Investigation of a Computer-Based Therapy Program Replicated in Four Cases
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gail Ramsberger
    University of Colorado at Boulder
  • Basem Marie
    University of Colorado at Boulder
  • Contact author: Gail Ramsberger, Department of Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences, UCB 409, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0409. E-mail: gail.ramsberger@colorado.edu.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2007
Self-Administered Cued Naming Therapy: A Single-Participant Investigation of a Computer-Based Therapy Program Replicated in Four Cases
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2007, Vol. 16, 343-358. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/038)
History: Received June 14, 2006 , Revised October 30, 2006 , Accepted April 16, 2007
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2007, Vol. 16, 343-358. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2007/038)
History: Received June 14, 2006; Revised October 30, 2006; Accepted April 16, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 38

Purpose This study examined the benefits of a self-administered, clinician-guided, computer-based, cued naming therapy. Results of intense and nonintense treatment schedules were compared.

Method A single-participant design with multiple baselines across behaviors and varied treatment intensity for 2 trained lists was replicated over 4 participants. Two lists of words were treated sequentially. The same methods and equal numbers of treatment sessions were used, but the number of sessions per week differed across word lists: nonintense (2/week) or intense (5/week). Probes of performance on both word lists were carried out to examine acquisition, maintenance, and generalization.

Results There was strong evidence of improved naming (acquisition) of trained words in 3 of the 4 participants regardless of treatment intensity. There was strong evidence of maintenance for 1 participant and moderate evidence for the remaining 3 participants. Evidence of generalization to untrained words was weak.

Conclusions Results suggest that self-administered, computer-based, cued naming therapy using a common mixed-cue protocol may be beneficial to a wide range of persons with aphasia regardless of treatment schedule. If results are replicated with a larger sample, treatments such as this may be a low-cost supplement or extension to traditional aphasia therapy.

Acknowledgments
We wish to thank the participants and their families for welcoming us into their lives and homes. Without their assistance, this project would not have been possible. We are also very grateful to the Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute in Philadelphia, which provided the MossTalk Words software for this study.
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