Update on a Clinical Measure for the Assessment of Problem Solving Purpose The Rapid Assessment of Problem Solving test (RAPS) is a clinical measure of problem solving based on the 20 Questions Test. This article updates clinicians on the RAPS, addresses questions raised about the test in an earlier article (R. C. Marshall, C. M. Karow, C. Morelli, K. Iden, & ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2008
Update on a Clinical Measure for the Assessment of Problem Solving
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert C. Marshall
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Colleen M. Karow
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Contact author: Robert C. Marshall, University of Kentucky (120F CTW), 900 S. Limestone, Lexington, KY 40536-0200. E-mail: rcmarsh@uky.edu.
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2008
Update on a Clinical Measure for the Assessment of Problem Solving
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2008, Vol. 17, 377-388. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/07-0071)
History: Received September 5, 2007 , Revised February 12, 2008 , Accepted March 13, 2008
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2008, Vol. 17, 377-388. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/07-0071)
History: Received September 5, 2007; Revised February 12, 2008; Accepted March 13, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The Rapid Assessment of Problem Solving test (RAPS) is a clinical measure of problem solving based on the 20 Questions Test. This article updates clinicians on the RAPS, addresses questions raised about the test in an earlier article (R. C. Marshall, C. M. Karow, C. Morelli, K. Iden, & J. Dixon, 2003a), and discusses the clinical utility of the RAPS.

Method The RAPS was administered to 373 normal adults. Tests were analyzed to assess the impact of demographic, psychometric, and other factors on performance on the RAPS. To determine the effects of strategy selection on test scores, participants were assigned to novel, category-focused, or mixed strategy groups based on the types of first questions asked.

Results Normal participants exhibited a range of performance levels on the RAPS. Participants in the novel strategy group performed significantly better than the participants in 2 other strategy groups.

Conclusions The RAPS is a clinically useful tool to examine problem solving that is easy to administer and to score. Findings suggest clinicians can use the RAPS with greater confidence than was the case 4 years ago. The RAPS is now part of the public domain and may be used by clinicians to assess clients' problem-solving deficits.

Acknowledgments
The authors are grateful for the assistance of Ashley Nietzel, Erin Montgomery, Karen Rose Hill, Abigail Dorton, and Cristin Schroering in the scoring and data preparation phase of this study.
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