The Communicative Effectiveness Survey: Preliminary Evidence of Construct Validity Purpose To provide preliminary evidence of the construct validity of the Communicative Effectiveness Survey (CES) for individuals with dysarthria and idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). Method In a prospective, quasi-experimental design, 25 participants each were assigned to 3 groups (N = 75): PD and dysarthria, non-PD and no dysarthria, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2008
The Communicative Effectiveness Survey: Preliminary Evidence of Construct Validity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Neila J. Donovan
    VA HSR&D/RR&D Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center, VA RR&D Brain Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center, University of Florida
  • Diane L. Kendall
    VA RR&D Brain Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center, University of Florida
  • Mary Ellen Young
    University of Florida
  • John C. Rosenbek
    VA RR&D Brain Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center, University of Florida
  • Contact author: Neila J. Donovan, who is now at Louisiana State University, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 72 Hatcher Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803. E-mail: ndonovan@lsu.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2008
The Communicative Effectiveness Survey: Preliminary Evidence of Construct Validity
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2008, Vol. 17, 335-347. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/07-0010)
History: Received February 16, 2007 , Revised August 3, 2007 , Accepted January 21, 2008
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2008, Vol. 17, 335-347. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/07-0010)
History: Received February 16, 2007; Revised August 3, 2007; Accepted January 21, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

Purpose To provide preliminary evidence of the construct validity of the Communicative Effectiveness Survey (CES) for individuals with dysarthria and idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD).

Method In a prospective, quasi-experimental design, 25 participants each were assigned to 3 groups (N = 75): PD and dysarthria, non-PD and no dysarthria, and PD significant others (SOs). Mean CES ratings were used to test for significant differences between the PD and non-PD group, and PD and SO rating of PD’s communicative effectiveness. Multiple linear regression tested for significant predictors of CES ratings for PD group only using sentence intelligibility and spontaneous speech intelligibility scores as predictor variables.

Results The PD group rated their CES significantly lower than did the non-PD group. The PD group rated their CES significantly higher than their SOs rated them. Neither speech intelligibility score was a significant predictor of CES ratings. In follow-up analysis, the Hoehn and Yahr PD staging accounted for 47% of the variability in CES ratings for the PD group participants.

Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence of the CES’s construct validity. Clinicians and researchers who assess and treat individuals with PD may consider adding an additional assessment to the traditional clinical measures (i.e., speech intelligibility) by obtaining a measure of communicative effectiveness.

Acknowledgments
This report is based on research funded by the VA Office of Academic Affairs Associated Health Rehabilitation Research Predoctoral Fellowship, through the VA RR&D Brain Rehabilitation Research Center of Excellence, and VA RR&D Associate Investigator Award O4296H through the VA HS&RD/RR&D Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center, Department of Veterans Affairs. This work could not have been accomplished without the support of Drs. Michael Okun, Hubert Fernandez, and Kelly Foote and their staff at the University of Florida Movement Disorders Clinic who gave us full access to their patients and valuable feedback during project development. We also wish to acknowledge the assistance and support of Craig A. Velozo, PhD, University of Florida, Department of Occupational Therapy, and Nan Musson, MA, North Florida/South Georgia VAMC, Gainesville, FL. The authors have no potential or existing conflicts of interest.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access