Transcribing the Speech of Children With Cochlear Implants: Clinical Application of Narrow Phonetic Transcriptions Purpose The phonological systems of children with cochlear implants may include segment inventories that contain both target and nontarget speech sounds. These children may not consistently follow phonological rules of the target language. These issues present a challenge for the clinical speech-language pathologist who uses phonetic transcriptions to evaluate speech ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   November 01, 2009
Transcribing the Speech of Children With Cochlear Implants: Clinical Application of Narrow Phonetic Transcriptions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy P. Teoh
    Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis
  • Steven B. Chin
    Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis
  • Contact author: Amy P. Teoh, 2397 Hopkins Farm Court, Browns Summit, NC 27214. E-mail: amypteoh@gmail.com.
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   November 01, 2009
Transcribing the Speech of Children With Cochlear Implants: Clinical Application of Narrow Phonetic Transcriptions
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2009, Vol. 18, 388-401. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2009/08-0076)
History: Received October 21, 2008 , Accepted June 15, 2009
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2009, Vol. 18, 388-401. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2009/08-0076)
History: Received October 21, 2008; Accepted June 15, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The phonological systems of children with cochlear implants may include segment inventories that contain both target and nontarget speech sounds. These children may not consistently follow phonological rules of the target language. These issues present a challenge for the clinical speech-language pathologist who uses phonetic transcriptions to evaluate speech production skills and to develop a plan of care. The purposes of this tutorial are to (a) identify issues associated with phonetic transcriptions of the speech of children with cochlear implants and (b) discuss implications for assessment.

Method Narrow transcription data from an ongoing, longitudinal research study were catalogued and reviewed. Study participants had at least 5 years of cochlear implant experience and used spoken American English as a primary means of communication. In this tutorial, selected phonetic symbols and phonetic phenomena are reviewed.

Conclusions A set of principles for phonetic transcriptions is proposed. Narrow phonetic transcriptions that include all segment possibilities in the International Phonetic Alphabet and extensions for disordered speech are needed to capture the subtleties of the speech of children with cochlear implants. Narrow transcriptions also may play a key role in planning treatment.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by research grant R01DC005594 from the National Institutes of Health to Indiana University. We are grateful to the children and parents who participated in this research study. We would also like to acknowledge Elizabeth Ying, Shirley Henning, and Bethany Gehrlein in the DeVault Otologic Research Laboratory for assistance with data collection, and Su Wooi Teoh and Katie Vaden for comments and suggestions.
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