Impact of Personal Relevance and Contextualization on Word-Picture Matching by People With Aphasia Purpose To determine the effect of personal relevance and contextualization of images on the preferences and word-picture matching accuracy of people with severe aphasia. Method Eight adults with aphasia performed 2 experimental tasks to reveal their preferences and accuracy during word-picture matching. The researchers used 3 types of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2010
Impact of Personal Relevance and Contextualization on Word-Picture Matching by People With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Miechelle L. McKelvey
    University of Nebraska-Kearney
  • Karen Hux
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Aimee Dietz
    University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • David R. Beukelman
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Contact author: Miechelle McKelvey, 1615 West 24th Street, COE Building, Room B141, University of Nebraska-Kearney, Kearney, NE 68849-5553. E-mail: mckelveyml@unk.edu.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2010
Impact of Personal Relevance and Contextualization on Word-Picture Matching by People With Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2010, Vol. 19, 22-33. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2009/08-0021)
History: Received March 20, 2008 , Revised October 17, 2008 , Accepted February 9, 2009
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2010, Vol. 19, 22-33. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2009/08-0021)
History: Received March 20, 2008; Revised October 17, 2008; Accepted February 9, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 28

Purpose To determine the effect of personal relevance and contextualization of images on the preferences and word-picture matching accuracy of people with severe aphasia.

Method Eight adults with aphasia performed 2 experimental tasks to reveal their preferences and accuracy during word-picture matching. The researchers used 3 types of visual stimuli—personally relevant, contextualized photographs; non-personally relevant, contextualized photographs; and noncontextualized, iconic images—paired with 3 types of target words—labels of people or objects, actions, and socially relevant events—as the stimulus materials.

Results Data analysis showed that participants (a) preferred using personally relevant, contextualized photographs rather than other types of photographs/images to represent target words and (b) performed more accurate word-picture matching when presented with target words associated with personally relevant, contextualized photographs than target words associated with noncontextualized or nonpersonalized photographs/images.

Conclusions Clinically, the findings highlight the importance of using personally relevant, contextualized photographs rather than generic contextualized photographs or noncontextualized, iconic images to support the communication attempts of people with aphasia who cannot communicate effectively using natural speech alone.

Acknowledgments
This project was performed as part of the first author’s dissertation research. This research was performed in part with support from the Barkley Trust and under Grant 11480026 from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), U.S. Department of Education. The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the grantee and do not necessarily reflect those of NIDRR or the Department of Education. The authors thank Sarah Wallace and Kristy Weissling—members of the Visual Scene Displays Research Team at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln—and John Bernthal and Christy Horn—members of the first author’s dissertation committee—for their assistance with the research.
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