Effects of Parent Instruction on the Symbolic Communication of Children Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication During Storybook Reading Purpose This study investigated the effects of a communication partner instruction strategy for parents of children using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) on the communicative turn taking of their children. Instruction was provided within storybook-reading contexts. Method Two single-subject multiple-probe-across-participants designs were used to evaluate the effects of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2010
Effects of Parent Instruction on the Symbolic Communication of Children Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication During Storybook Reading
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Kent-Walsh
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Cathy Binger
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Zishan Hasham
    Seminole County Public Schools, Sanford, FL
  • Contact author: Cathy Binger, University of New Mexico, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, 1 University of New Mexico, MSC01 1195, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001. E-mail: cbinger@unm.edu.
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2010
Effects of Parent Instruction on the Symbolic Communication of Children Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication During Storybook Reading
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2010, Vol. 19, 97-107. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0014)
History: Received March 1, 2009 , Revised October 20, 2009 , Accepted January 29, 2010
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2010, Vol. 19, 97-107. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0014)
History: Received March 1, 2009; Revised October 20, 2009; Accepted January 29, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

Purpose This study investigated the effects of a communication partner instruction strategy for parents of children using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) on the communicative turn taking of their children. Instruction was provided within storybook-reading contexts.

Method Two single-subject multiple-probe-across-participants designs were used to evaluate the effects of parent instruction on (a) 3 European American parents and (b) 3 African American parents. Changes in turn-taking rates and the expression of different semantic concepts in children using AAC were assessed in storybook-reading activities.

Results All 6 parents learned to implement the communication partner interaction strategy accurately. All 6 children who used AAC increased their communicative turn taking and their language use as reflected by different semantic concepts expressed.

Conclusions Results provide evidence that the communication partner instruction program applied within storybook-reading contexts holds significant promise in improving parent–child interaction patterns and facilitating communicative expression and turn taking in children who use AAC.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by funding from the following: a New Investigator Research Grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation; an In-House Research Grant from the University of Central Florida; the University of Central Florida Academy for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership; and the University of Central Florida Center for Autism and Related Disabilities. Preliminary results were presented at the Biennial Conference of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Natal, Brazil, in October 2004. The authors would like to thank student researchers Jessica Keller, Lauren Weiss, and Melissa Doan Malani for their assistance with this project. The authors also thank the parents and children who made this study possible.
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