Research  |   August 2011
Language Abilities of Children Who Stutter: A Meta-Analytical Review
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edward G. Conture
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Mark W. Lipsey
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Correspondence to Katerina Ntourou: katerina.ntourou@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor: Laura Justice
    Editor: Laura Justice×
  • Associate Editor: Patrick Finn
    Associate Editor: Patrick Finn×
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions
Research   |   August 2011
Language Abilities of Children Who Stutter: A Meta-Analytical Review
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology August 2011, Vol.20, 163-179. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/09-0102)
History: Accepted 04 Mar 2011 , Received 10 Nov 2009 , Revised 29 Jun 2010
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology August 2011, Vol.20, 163-179. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/09-0102)
History: Accepted 04 Mar 2011 , Received 10 Nov 2009 , Revised 29 Jun 2010

Purpose: To identify, integrate, and summarize evidence from empirical studies of the language abilities of children who stutter (CWS) and children who do not stutter (CWNS).

Method: Candidate studies were identified through electronic databases, the tables of contents of speech-language journals, and reference lists of relevant articles and literature reviews. The 22 included studies met the following criteria: studied both children who did and did not stutter between ages 2;0 (years;months) and 8;0, and reported norm-referenced language measures and/or measures from spontaneous language samples amenable to effect size calculation. Data were extracted using a coding manual and were assessed by application of general and specialized analytical software. Mean difference effect size was estimated using Hedges’s g (Hedges, 1982).

Results: Findings indicated that CWS scored significantly lower than CWNS on norm-referenced measures of overall language (Hedges’s g = −0.48), receptive (Hedges’s g = −0.52) and expressive vocabulary (Hedges’s g = −0.41), and mean length of utterance (Hedges’s g = −0.23).

Conclusions: Present findings were taken to suggest that children’s language abilities are potentially influential variables associated with childhood stuttering.

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