Research  |   August 2011
Language Abilities of Children Who Stutter: A Meta-Analytical Review
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edward G. Conture
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Mark W. Lipsey
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Correspondence to Katerina Ntourou: katerina.ntourou@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor: Laura Justice
    Editor: Laura Justice×
  • Associate Editor: Patrick Finn
    Associate Editor: Patrick Finn×
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions
Research   |   August 2011
Language Abilities of Children Who Stutter: A Meta-Analytical Review
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2011, Vol. 20, 163-179. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/09-0102)
History: Received November 10, 2009 , Revised June 29, 2010 , Accepted March 4, 2011
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2011, Vol. 20, 163-179. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2011/09-0102)
History: Received November 10, 2009; Revised June 29, 2010; Accepted March 4, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

Purpose: To identify, integrate, and summarize evidence from empirical studies of the language abilities of children who stutter (CWS) and children who do not stutter (CWNS).

Method: Candidate studies were identified through electronic databases, the tables of contents of speech-language journals, and reference lists of relevant articles and literature reviews. The 22 included studies met the following criteria: studied both children who did and did not stutter between ages 2;0 (years;months) and 8;0, and reported norm-referenced language measures and/or measures from spontaneous language samples amenable to effect size calculation. Data were extracted using a coding manual and were assessed by application of general and specialized analytical software. Mean difference effect size was estimated using Hedges’s g (Hedges, 1982).

Results: Findings indicated that CWS scored significantly lower than CWNS on norm-referenced measures of overall language (Hedges’s g = −0.48), receptive (Hedges’s g = −0.52) and expressive vocabulary (Hedges’s g = −0.41), and mean length of utterance (Hedges’s g = −0.23).

Conclusions: Present findings were taken to suggest that children’s language abilities are potentially influential variables associated with childhood stuttering.

Acknowledgments
This investigation was supported in part by National Institutes of Health Grants DC000523-14A1, 2R56DC000523-14A1, and DC006477-01A2 to Vanderbilt University, as well as Clinical and Translational Science Award 1 UL1 RR024975 to Vanderbilt from the National Center for Research Resources. We would like to thank Melanie Schuele for providing her scholarly insight, guidance, and commitment toward the development of this study. Also, special thanks to Robin M. Jones for interjudge measurement reliability.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access