Article  |   February 2013
Response to Dynamic Language Tasks Among Typically Developing Latino Preschool Children With Bilingual Experience
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Janet L. Patterson
    The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Barbara L. Rodríguez
    The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Philip S. Dale
    The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Correspondence to Janet L. Patterson: jpatters@unm.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Article
Article   |   February 2013
Response to Dynamic Language Tasks Among Typically Developing Latino Preschool Children With Bilingual Experience
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2013, Vol. 22, 103-112. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0129)
History: Received October 13, 2011 , Revised April 13, 2012 , Accepted September 7, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2013, Vol. 22, 103-112. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0129)
History: Received October 13, 2011; Revised April 13, 2012; Accepted September 7, 2012

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether typically developing preschool children with bilingual experience show evidence of learning within brief dynamic assessment language tasks administered in a graduated prompting framework. Dynamic assessment has shown promise for accurate identification of language impairment in bilingual children, and a graduated prompting approach may be well-suited to screening for language impairment.

Method: Three dynamic language tasks with graduated prompting were presented to 32 typically developing 4-year-olds in the language to which the child had the most exposure (16 Spanish, 16 English). The tasks were a novel word learning task, a semantic task, and a phonological awareness task.

Results: Children’s performance was significantly higher on the last 2 items compared with the first 2 items for the semantic and the novel word learning tasks among children who required a prompt on the 1st item. There was no significant difference between the 1st and last items on the phonological awareness task.

Conclusions: Within-task improvements in children’s performance for some tasks administered within a brief, graduated prompting framework were observed. Thus, children’s responses to graduated prompting may be an indicator of modifiability, depending on the task type and level of difficulty.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by a research allocation grant from the University of New Mexico. Rachael Dalto, Maria Marentes, Stephanie McDougle, Joshua McDowell, and Xavier Ortiz contributed to task development and conducted the data collection and entry. Jennifer Romero and Mireya Hernandez contributed to the reliability analyses. We also thank the YDI Head Start and City of Albuquerque Child Development Center programs.
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